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Sarah Iverson’s got hair stepping stones to great style on the corner, and they got her her own.

“I’d wanted my own — that was always my goal. With every shop I worked at, I took a little bit of what I enjoyed. They were stepping stones…I took the good and the bad experiences at each and ran with it,” Iverson said.

She is the proprietor of Corner Cuts Salon, the new shop on the corner of Main and Second Street in downtown Chatfield. She explained she arrived there from her aspiration to give everyone who sits in her chair great style and her dreams of actually being able to own a salon and give everyone a great hairstyle.
Sarah Iverson’s got hair stepping stones to great style on the corner, and they got her her own. “I’d wanted my own — that was always my goal. With every shop I worked at, I took a little bit of what I enjoyed. They were stepping stones…I took the good and the bad experiences at each and ran with it,” Iverson said. She is the proprietor of Corner Cuts Salon, the new shop on the corner of Main and Second Street in downtown Chatfield. She explained she arrived there from her aspiration to give everyone who sits in her chair great style and her dreams of actually being able to own a salon and give everyone a great hairstyle.
Wednesday, September 20, 2017 10:09 PM

Sarah Iverson’s got hair stepping stones to great style on the corner, and they got her her own.

“I’d wanted my own — that was always my goal. With every shop I worked at, I took a little bit of what I enjoyed. They were stepping stones…I took the good and the bad experiences at each and ran with it,” Iverson said.

She is the proprietor of Corner Cuts Salon, the new shop on the corner of Main and Second Street in downtown Chatfield. She explained she arrived there from her aspiration to give everyone who sits in her chair great style and her dreams of actually being able to own a salon and give everyone a great hairstyle.

  • New salon owner journeys towards achieving dreams

    Sarah Iverson’s got hair stepping stones to great style on the corner, and they got her her own.

    “I’d wanted my own — that was always my goal. With every shop I worked at, I took a little bit of what I enjoyed. They were stepping stones…I took the good and the bad experiences at each and ran with it,” Iverson said.

    She is the proprietor of Corner Cuts Salon, the new shop on the corner of Main and Second Street in downtown Chatfield. She explained she arrived there from her aspiration to give everyone who sits in her chair great style and her dreams of actually being able to own a salon and give everyone a great hairstyle.

  • Chatfield’s City Council was done handling business in less than 20 minutes during its Monday, Sept. 11, meeting.

    City Clerk Joel Young presented a revised waste hauling agreement between the city and Wm. Hanson Waste Hauling that will accommodate the city’s decision to have recyclables picked up at the curb more often than previously done.

    Young related that the agreement makes way for the payment necessary for the services. The councilors voted in favor of approving the agreement.

  • Chatfield FFA chapter hosts fourth blood drive

    Plasma, platelets, cells and ag, oh my! Plasma, platelets, cells and ag, oh my!

    “FFA does two blood drives this year — this one and another one this coming April — and I am the coordinator of this blood drive because I’m doing it for a scholarship,” stated Chatfield FFA member Maggie Lowrey.

    The Chatfield FFA chapter organized a blood drive held last Wednesday, Sept. 13, at the high school, where citizens who had plasma, platelets and cells to share could donate them through the Red Cross Bloodmobile to others in need of a fill-up.

  • Chatfield brothers have friendly rivalry at state fair

    Their last year together, and Jerico got Patrick’s goat.

    “This is my last year in 4-H — I graduated from high school in June 2016,” highlighted Root River Rabbits 4-Her Jerico Drogemuller, who declared, “My goat took first in her class at the county and state fairs and grand champion unrecorded senior doe at the state fair. She got grand champion and best udder at the county fair.”

    All of this really, really irritates his younger brother, Patrick.

    Because last year, Patrick’s goat, Medusa, bested Jerico’s goat at the county and state fairs. This year, not so much.

  • Chatfield plants wheatgrass as part of new pilot study to reduce nitrates in drinking water

    The city of Chatfield’s doing some new grass revival.

    It’s a plot to de-nitrate and de-leach.

    “‘Kernza’ is the trademarked name for a new perennial grain that is being developed in partnership between the University of Minnesota and The Land Institute, from the perennial grass ‘intermediate wheatgrass.’ Intermediate wheatgrass was introduced to the U.S. as a forage crop and was selected as a candidate for development into a perennial grain crop in the 1980s,” explained Jacob Jungers of the University of Minnesota.

  • All-American Co-op sites sold, plans for redevelopment in the works

    The west side of Chatfield’s Main Street landscape will likely change in the coming year or so, as the former All-American Co-op elevator site and grain scale were purchased by two local residents who have other businesses in Chatfield.

    General Manager Glenn Lutteke, who works at the Stewartville All-American site, confirmed that the Chatfield site had been sold, but declined to speculate on what might come of it following the sale. The site permanently closed for business on Jan. 20, due to the expense of making repairs to the grain bins and elevator.

  • Bonding committee stops at Chatfield Center for the Arts to see proposals for future growth
    Members of the Chatfield community welcomed members of the Minnesota House of Representatives Bonding Committee last Wednesday morning. The agenda for the gathering included members of the Chatfield Economic Development Authority (EDA) and the Chatfield Center for the Arts, Inc., sharing why the city would like to have the arts center included in the 2018 bonding bill.
  • Say it: “Minn-neh-soh-ta.”

    Next, of course, is the word “hotdish,” but after that comes the pottery.

    “The hotdish cook-off…the idea of this is to celebrate one of Minnesota’s and a Midwestern food tradition,” said Chatfield Center for the Arts (CCA) co-director Jenni Petersen-Brant. “We’re open to interpretations on what a hotdish is – the only rule is that it must be cooked in a single baking dish and served hot.”

    Petersen-Brant, who, along with her husband, Eric, will witness the influx of hotdishes — or for some, “casseroles” — to the first-ever Chatfield Heritage Day hotdish contest. This auspicious event is being held as part of the third annual observation of Heritage Day, a fall festival to mark the vibrant history of the Chosen Valley this Saturday, Sept. 16.

  • New special education teacher looking forward to helping students find success

    Greg Schaitel is thinking now what he wasn’t thinking way back when.

    “I can’t even remember what I wanted to grow up to be. I know I wasn’t thinking teaching,” stated Chatfield’s new fourth through sixth grade special education instructor, sharing that he never imagined himself to someday be a teacher.

    Schaitel graduated from high school in Sparta, Wis., in 1994, after which he attended Winona State University in Winona.

  • The Fillmore County commissioners entertained a short agenda during the Tuesday, Sept. 12, board meeting, but handled some important items of business. County Coordinator Bobbie Vickerman updated the board on the proposed 2018 budget, saying, “Right now, we’re still sitting at 7.12 percent…can we propose the preliminary at that? We can bring it down.”

  • The Fillmore County commissioners entertained a short agenda during the Tuesday, Sept. 12, board meeting, but handled some important items of business.
  • The Fillmore County Unit of Townships Banquet on Tuesday, Sept. 12, will be featuring speaker Jerry Williams. The banquet will be held at Wheelers Bar and Grill in Harmony with social hour at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m.
  • County Attorney Brett Corson and Zoning Administrator Cristal Adkins updated Fillmore County commissioners on ongoing civil litigation against Amish residents — regarding the need to have gray water systems installed on farmsteads to handle household wastewater — during the Tuesday, Sept. 5, board meeting.
  • Chatfield resident accepts new role at high school

    Tom Moody wanted to either be far out or in the woods.

    “I really wanted to be an astronaut or a forest ranger when I was little. I thought both of those would be really cool jobs,” stated Chatfield High School’s new seventh through 12th grade special education instructor.

  • Julie Young’s looking for more people to steer her Habitat.

    It’s a way to have A Brush with Kindness and do more worthwhile.

    “In the beginning, the Chatfield Habitat for Humanity group held its first community informational meeting in October of 2013,” Young said. “There were about eight people who attended this meeting and learned what it would take to develop a group in our community.”

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Opioids

Health officials are concerned about the dramatic rise in drug overdoses in Minnesota since 2000, mostly due to opioids. Is that a growing problem in this area of Minnesota?


 

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