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The Marlatt family seems to be quite content. This photo makes it quite evident that my niece, Katelyn, and her husband, Chris, are totally in love with their new daughter, Emily Claire.
The Marlatt family seems to be quite content. This photo makes it quite evident that my niece, Katelyn, and her husband, Chris, are totally in love with their new daughter, Emily Claire.
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Tuesday, September 05, 2017 9:56 PM

I have fallen head over heels in love with our newest member of the family, Emily Claire Marlatt. My great-niece was born on Aug. 26, at 5:25 a.m. in Rota, Spain. Her parents are my niece, Katelyn, and her husband, Chris, who is currently stationed at the Naval base there. Miss Emily was 9 pounds, 7 ounces, when she was born and was 22 and 1/8 inches long.

I learned of her arrival in the middle of the night, here in Minnesota, when Katelyn posted her little family’s first “selfie,” with Emily cradled between Chris and Katelyn, looking so beautiful. Her parents’ joy was evident by their smiles and expressions of complete adoration.

  • The muted light during the eclipse of the sun about a week ago was still bright enough to shine on the spiraling prices at the gas pumps. This wasn’t the eclipse that awed millions when the moon’s shadow covered the sun, lowering the level of light in Minnesota during the early afternoon on Aug. 21. Instead, this was about two weeks later when the sunshine was muted by wildfire smoke drifting in from southwest Canada and the Pacific Northwest. The smoke, which came in several waves, muted the direct sunlight, created some gorgeous sunsets, but also triggering air quality alerts in parts of Minnesota.

  • Too Hick to be Square: Family photos one thing the Clan does poorly
    If you’ve been following Too Hick To be Square for the past 2+ years I’ve been writing it, you may have started to think that there’s nothing the Clan can’t do.
  • Mayberry was a fictional community made famous by “The Andy Griffith Show” in the 1960s. Although it represented an idealized version of rural life, it resonated with many people and had some legitimacy as a portrayal of a real community. Life has changed drastically in the ensuing 50 years, so much so that people would just laugh if anyone pretended Mayberry depicted a basis for reality today.

  • Too Hick to be Square: Mom manages 13 classrooms with secret weapon
    When I mention that my 12 siblings and I are all home schooled, people tend to have one of two reactions.
  • Heart swells with arrival of great-niece

    I have fallen head over heels in love with our newest member of the family, Emily Claire Marlatt. My great-niece was born on Aug. 26, at 5:25 a.m. in Rota, Spain. Her parents are my niece, Katelyn, and her husband, Chris, who is currently stationed at the Naval base there. Miss Emily was 9 pounds, 7 ounces, when she was born and was 22 and 1/8 inches long.

    I learned of her arrival in the middle of the night, here in Minnesota, when Katelyn posted her little family’s first “selfie,” with Emily cradled between Chris and Katelyn, looking so beautiful. Her parents’ joy was evident by their smiles and expressions of complete adoration.

  • Glimpses of Yesteryear: Local merchants tout benefits in 1937 farm book

    In scanning the Spring Valley Historical Society files, we found a "Simplicity Farm Account Book" that was kept for several months. "This book was made possible by the merchants or business firms whose advertising appears herein, in appreciation of your past patronage." Dated 1937, it was done by Terpstra Bros. Advertising Co. of Des Moines, and was available for 10 cents per copy, but seemed to have been distributed as a rural local box holder.



  • Here’s something I never thought I would say: I want to be a float princess someday. Kind of.

  • We are emphasizing the importance of your community newspaper by subtraction — a front page devoid of news — this week as part of a statewide “whiteout” campaign in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Minnesota Newspaper Association, of which we are members. It’s a not-so-subtle reminder of all that you would lose if your local newspaper ceased to exist.
  • Glimpses of Yesteryear: Lutheran congregations come together in 1950
    A few years ago, 2013, a gift was received from Mrs. Robert (Renata) Voeltz — a 1951 "Your Household Guide" sponsored by the Ladies Aid Society of Our Saviors Lutheran Church.    This book contained 1,001 helpful household hints selected from several hundred home recipe books of Walsworth Bros., located in Marceline, Missouri, distributed throughout the nation.  Before we relate what was in the book, a brief history of Our Saviors Lutheran Church follows. 
  • Food for the Neighborhood: Summer Roasted Vegetables and a birthday surprise
    My fridge contains an odd variety of garden vegetables, which for one reason or another, don't get sold at the farmers market or given to CSA (community supported agriculture) customers. They would not win a beauty contest, but they are still good food.
  • One of the childhood books I most remember is “The Little Engine That Could.” I know I read many books as a child, including Dr. Seuss and even the “Dick and Jane” books in school. However the “Little Engine” book just stands above the rest.
  • Too Hick to be Square: Clan hot dogs are unusually high in carbon
    Everyone loves bonfires in the summer—the snap and crackle of logs, the hot dogs and marshmallows roasting over glowing coals, and of course the smoke that inevitably blows directly in your face.
  • We may not have the bodies of water that make up the Land of 10,000 Lakes, but water is still important in our region of Minnesota, which features bluffs, springs, caves and many streams. These unique geographic features, including sinkholes and disappearing rivers, components of karst geology, also create challenges to keep our water clean.
  • Glimpses of Yesteryear: Horse era provided many options for saddles
    Remember when the saddle clubs were very active, and the groups — families included — were everywhere, be it parades or otherwise?  In checking with Yvonne Kraling, she says there are indeed saddle clubs, and they are active in Chatfield's Western Days parades. 
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Dreamers

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