Local News | Sports - High School
 
Licensed, professional geologist and avid trout fisherman Jeff Broberg of Eyota, right, discusses a spring northwest of Fountain. A stop at the site occurred during the National Trout Center of Preston's geology field tour held Nov. 1 in Fillmore County. A few of the participants on the bus tour are seen at left.
Licensed, professional geologist and avid trout fisherman Jeff Broberg of Eyota, right, discusses a spring northwest of Fountain. A stop at the site occurred during the National Trout Center of Preston's geology field tour held Nov. 1 in Fillmore County. A few of the participants on the bus tour are seen at left.
Wednesday, November 12, 2014 10:27 AM

Imagine looking north toward Rochester… and seeing a wall of ice 5,000 feet to a mile tall. Around you there would be nothing — no trees or anything to mark the permafrost, tundra-like landscape.

  • National Trout Center’s geology tour ‘rocks the area’

    Imagine looking north toward Rochester… and seeing a wall of ice 5,000 feet to a mile tall. Around you there would be nothing — no trees or anything to mark the permafrost, tundra-like landscape.

     
  • Give to the Max Day returns for area  community foundation challenges

    Ready for another round of fundraising for the community? Give to the Max Day is just around the corner, beginning at midnight on Thursday, Nov. 13. Once again members of the Spring Valley, Preston, Harmony and Rushford communities are gearing up for the one-day, online donation spree.

     
  • Wykoff Area Veterans Memorial to provide lasting legacy

    The Wykoff Area Veterans Memorial all began with the Wykoff Mystery — the disappearance of the Wykoff Honor Roll, which was once the city’s memorial to local veterans.  The wooden structure disappeared a number of years ago, leaving only one known picture behind.

     
  • Regional peace, justice center working to expand service area

    Those are just three of the ways the Northeast Iowa Peace and Justice Center (NEIPJC) serves those in a five-county area.

     
  • Body snatchers create unsolved historic mystery in Preston cemetery

     Once you’re dead and buried, it usually marks the end of your life story. For a Preston man who died of lung fever in 1872, it proved to be the beginning of his death story: the disappearance of his corpse from its eternal residency in the old graveyard atop Preston’s south hill.

     
  • Harmony historical society seeks  to expand membership, resources

    Members of the Harmony Area Historical Society will be highlighting the organization’s accomplishments over the past year as well as making plans for the future during its annual meeting on Thursday, Oct. 23, at 2 p.m. in the Harmony Visitor Center conference room.

     
  • Mabel House Hotel thriving under new ownership

    Since February, the Mabel House Hotel has been Cristal Adkin’s pet project. Her grandfather, Laverne Vickerman, purchased the historic hotel and took possession of the building in February of 2014.

     
  • Protected Forever

    Joel Johnson of Money Creek Township in Houston County didn't have to struggle with the decision to enroll a portion of his farm in a conservation easement. It just seemed like the right thing to do.

     
  • Throughout the year our readers have voted for their favorite business and regional picks in several categories. Those votes have been tallied and the Bluff Country Newspaper Group is excited to share the results of the 10th annual Best of Bluff Country Contest!

     
  • Ed’s Museum a Wykoff legacy

    a quarter century later, there’s a party to be held because of Edwin Krueger, his stuff and the store he left it in when he died in 1989 at 91 – an anniversary, or a birthday, whatever you want to call it —  because the town had to figure out what, exactly, should be done to preserve that which was Ed, the “consummate collector and record keeper,” as Carolyn Baker Meyer, president of the Wykoff Area Historical Society (WAHS) fondly calls the late grocer whose string, notes, grocery orders, Jell-O, lost teeth and other miscellany is the primary reason WAHS is marking its 25th anniversary during Fall Fest, Sept. 26 through Sept. 28.

     
  • Lanesboro runner embraces challenge  to run Alaskan cross-country marathon

    Mike Gjere of Lanesboro ran on dirt trails riddled with obstacles like tree roots, mud bogs and ice cold water.

     
  • Fountain, Ostrander police officer keeping up with new law enforcement technology
    Placing small cameras on police officers is a fast-growing trend in policing. The cameras can play an important role in improving evidence collection, as well as interaction between law enforcement and the public.
     
  • Put a little color into life – participate in Leve for Farge

    Autumn will soon be here and the colors of the trees and vegetation will soon be changing from vibrant greens to golden yellows, deep reds and hearty ambers. People will also soon be changing color during the first weekend of October during Spring Grove’s annual fall festival – Uff Da Fest.

     
  • Miss Fillmore County gains confidence  through Miss Minnesota International program

    Sydney Johnson, 19, of Lanesboro, never expected to do so well when she got the chance to compete against many girls for the title of Miss Minnesota. She saw the Miss Minnesota International pageant as a way to become more confident in herself. 

     
  • Local ‘hair brained’ ideas have ripple effect on Vermont community

    Many years ago, in the halls of Preston-Fountain High School, a drama teacher saw potential in one of his students and convinced him to participate in the school play.

     
MNsure opening

Officials are saying the opening weekend of Mnsure went smoothly. Have your experiences been positive or negative?



 

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